07:00 AM: I leave my abode for the day’s work after an enormous 100% recharge throughout the night, very thankful for the day ahead. 8:00 AM mid-way the journey and I have dropped a few percentages. Blame it on the sickening traffic jam that clogs autos plying the many Kampala roads in and around its suburbs, the days mails, news, push notifications, browsing and ephemeral IMs that normally bubble in the morning while I sift through my phone. These  put a dent to my phone’s battery. 80% battery percentage it reads.

12:00PM with the workload weighing in and the battery reads 45%. Before I know it, I have to find a wall docket within my proximity to recharge while enjoying lunch or carry with me a battery bank, just in case things go south. It’s a tale many smartphone users would love to tell while others have worst case scenarios than the elaboration above.

In dire need of the perfect smartphone, we tend to shed smartphone battery juice for sleekness and it becomes  obligatory for us to carry around battery packs and accessories which in return sacrifice the sleekness we sought for in the first place! No one in the OEM world seems to have cracked the battery problem and research shows we still have a long way to go in this regard.

I happen to have attended a farewell dinner, graced by the uppermost echelons of Kampala sending off a notable figure. I couldn’t stop but gaze at the battery accessories donning dinner tables, charging the many gizmos that these distinguished guests had on them. The iPhones, the S7 Edges and others in that order. It even stirred an argument with my table mates and thus the read.

Let me not forget how annoying it has become visiting a coffee shop, restaurant, or other establishments where finding charging docks is like finding a needle in a haystack. Why? We have smartphone battery problems so we need charging ports to give our smartphone a breath of their oxygen. Its more appealing to hangout in areas well suited to cater for such demands than it is, in places that don’t give a damn. Still, our smartphone batteries are to blame!

“I was once promised a 3000mAH battery smartphone running for a solid three days”

These slabs hold too much computing power we can’t do away with but are always  limited by their batteries. A new gizmo will first impress only to turn sour a few months down the road. Still, the battery! It  might be that I am a heavy user but sentiments shared by several smartphone users are no deviation from what I have put across.

I was once promised a 3000mAH battery smartphone running for a solid three days and without second thought, I told the sales rep to stop mincing words he won’t take back given the count is not representative of the number of days the battery lasts but usage. Nevertheless, I bought the phone not for the battery hullabaloo, but for the spec sheet and I was proved right.

I recently interacted with the Xiaomi Redmi Note 3 with a 4000mAh battery but itself couldn’t last a day without recharge, though I must say; I didn’t reach out for my wall docket more often than I do with my Samsung.

I applaud the innovation that has become of the smartphone but until the battery life gets rectified, the ultimate smartphone will never come to life lest we sacrifice the oomph that attracted some of us to them.

Fast charging is a warm welcome so is wireless charging but I need not charge every time to get through the day, since this on the other hand deteriorates the battery to the brim. The normal lithium-ion battery only goes through 600 cycles of charge and discharge, beyond that normally dictates Armageddon so the deterioration.

Since its a long way coming to finally see technology addressing this at consumer level, whoever addresses this is set to spark off a new revolution in tech, guaranteed sales and will ride along this revolution until a new contender comes at play.

Until these agitations for a long lasting battery technology are not brought to rest, there is no such a thing as the ultimate smartphone. We forever have a smartphone battery problem.

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