How to secure your Google account from hackers

As we promised, this is a second part in the three part series of protecting your online accounts. The first part was Facebook and now we give you more tips on how to protect your Google account from nosy fellows. The global idea is similar to that of Facebook , its by setting up two factor authentication.

Google makes two-factor authentication simple enough, but it can be very frustrating to configure if you log into Google across multiple devices. To get started, log into your Google account and navigate to the Security section of your Account Settings page.

Pop down to the 2-step verification section and flip it on by clicking the big Settings button and following Google’s step-by-step guide to link your account with the number of a cell phone or land line. Google will either text or robocall you at that number to provide a six-digit code every time you try to log into your Google Account from an “untrusted” device, so make
sure you use the number of a phone you keep close at hand.

Google offers a plethora of services across multiple devices, so it’s apropos that it offers a similar plethora of options for configuring two-factor login authentication.

You can also generate one-time use codes that you can write down and save for times when you want to log into Google in the absence of cell service. Generate five or ten of these codes, and keep them in your wallet for emergencies. Also consider downloading the Google Authenticator app for iOS and Android if you don’t want Google sending you text messages every time you check your mail from a new computer.

It’s simple to use, and can generate codes for any authentication service that employs the TOTP (Time-based One-Time Password) algorithm, including Facebook and Dropbox. I recommend setting it up to do so if you’re going to be enabling two-factor authentication on other services, but be aware that this will make it very difficult for you to log into those services without your phone. If your phone is lost or stolen—or if you just accidentally delete the authenticator app—it’s possible to download a fresh version and re-authenticate across every service you use, but it’s a real pain.

VIA: PC World

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