An open letter to all telecoms in Uganda

Open letter to the telecoms in Uganda

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[/blockquote]My name is Remmie, a senior editor at Techjaja. This is my open writing to all telecoms in Uganda. I subscribe to almost all telecoms, but they should strive hard to lure me to their service and here is why. I have as many SIM cards as I can pronounce, but I have failed to settle on a single telcom. Not that am confused, but am always on wheels trekking from big yellow, big red, orange plus that ratcheted blue network that some could say disappeared into oblivion. I as well subscribe to Smart, Vodafone and now Smile Telecom. Truth be told, I am tired of this on and off relationship with the telcos. One reason for my continued migration is that I find neither one satisfactory. One performs better than the other at different fronts.
So while I go down slogans like customer is king! It is never applicable when it comes to a section of Ugandan telecoms, thus my refusal to settle down on a single carrier. One will be good at voice quality, the other at high data speeds, and some cutthroat pricing while the rest are a bunch of mediocres.

These carriers should instead sit down, read this article with thought, convey the message to their meetings and decide on the next way forward. FYI, am not alone singing this chorus, a legion follows up but I stood tall to write this.

Poor coverage

Open Signal 2016 H1
Only if bigger meant better, I would speed down on writing this article and instead drop thanks to whoever claims to have the biggest network in Uganda. Why should we carry multiple sim cards if at all the carrier we choose could avail us uninterrupted coverage across Uganda?
Just yesterday, I couldn’t make a call over MTN from a hill in Mpererwe, it took the effort of moving around the enclosure to have a good reception. I instead swapped to Airtel, it was a better choice. Others like Vodafone and Smart Telecom should be reading this.

Inconsistent Internet speeds

Hold it there right there Airtel! You need to upgrade your Internet speeds ASAP. The smartphone network slogan should hold only if it goes with robust Internet speeds, not just in Kampala but across Uganda.
And to the likes of; Smart Telecom, Vodafone, oh my God UTL, I extend the memo to you. Okay, we heard that your Fiber links were interrupted, but in any risk management book out there is something I can easily summarize as always having a backup, go read that right there.

Privacy

Did I forget to give Africell a mention?  Celebrate not. The multiple calls from fraudsters trying to con us have become so rampant. If you had these conmen registered at your central databases, then Kayihura would be a happy guy putting them behind bars. Work on your vulnerabilities that these ‘sharp minds’ exploit. Its killing our privacy.

Unsolicited messagesUCC failed Spam SMS

If you have claimants over damages inflicted on them by services they didn’t solicit from you, that’s how compensation comes at play given you have to refund them for the damages caused. Those unsolicited messages are one of our worst nightmares. The sad part being them encroaching on our airtime balance every time they find their way to our inboxes. This is a universal plea to all and unsubscribing from them often proves futile than not. At least give back our airtime and then we shall calm down.

Poor customer care

Once upon a time I tried to reach a customer help line only to wait for several minutes unattended to, that I finally gave up. The tech savvy me took to Twitter (That was last year) and up to now I am still waiting for a reply to my DM. I am still waiting for my reply Africell. Others are quick to reply to our complaints but not all, over their social feeds. Kudos to ones that are quick and a thumbs down to ones that take centuries.
The question however is; what about the poor villager who knows nothing about Twitter of Facebook ? The undocumented rudeness by some of your customer care attendant?

Not until such issues have been rectified shall we declare whose service we should subscribe to. For now the migration continues. Do you have your own open letter to the telecoms, feel free to hit our Youblog section and send us your thoughts.

 

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