Microsoft to reportedly bring Android apps to Windows

Andorid on WIndows

One thing is for sure, for any mobile phone ecosystem to prosper, it should have great apps and not only great apps, but many apps. It’s a recent trend for developers to release apps for iOS initially, followed Android and lastly Windows Phone if they are lucky. This has put Microsoft in a situation where they have to go head over heels to lure developers to their platform.  According to The Guardian, Microsoft should dump Windows Phone and create its own version of Android — but Arstechnica says it will be unreasonably difficult task. Microsoft names a new CEO last week, who is  mobile and cloud centric guy, and this gives rumors of Android apps coming to Windows, hold more water.

Sources are telling The Verge that the company is seriously considering allowing Android apps to run on both Windows and Windows Phone, just like what Blackberry tried to do with BB 10 OS. Of course expect some  Microsoft die hards to oppose this crazy wild Android running on Windows dream, especially when it comes to  enabling Android apps inside its Windows and Windows Phone Stores. The Verge further says that the mixed (and strong) feelings internally highlight that Microsoft will need to be careful with any radical move.

Not far back Windows on PC was the in thing, but now it seems Android has taken over the mobile space — it’s everywhere. Basically,  Google did what Microsoft was doing with windows in the 90s, but the difference was it was “Open Source” with no licensing fees. Android’s growth has placed a big barrier for Microsoft’s mobile efforts world wide. For Microsoft, meanwhile, it’s a challenge of growing Windows Phone shipments and apps. Running Android apps on Windows Phone and Windows could serve as a Band-Aid.

If the latest rumor Nokia’s Android Budget Phone not having Google services, but still based on Android, pans out to be true, we shall see and official embrace of Android by Microsoft. The company wants to enable Android apps on Windows and control the store that consumers download them from but, if such a plan goes ahead, it will likely involve a third-party “enabler.”

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