Comprehending the Flow: Human Figures made of untangling stainless Steel Ribbons by Gil Bruvel

Human Figures made of untangling stainless Steel

As an art lover, every week i scan through the “internets” to get that that unique artist feature that brings out the digital humanism and love for the blend of art and humanity in me. This week i bring you a French born Australian Gil Bruvel. Blessed with an iron smith kinda talent, he panel beats metal into eye popping lovely art. 

“I remember when I started to experiment shaping up the general line of George’s Horse. I could literally feel the infusion of motion enter my work in real time. With each ribbon, the eye bends, curves, assembles, deforms, and traces the edges of each subject. The ribbons direct my emotions and creative flow with a force like I have never felt before. The smaller ones are subtle-the larger ones are essential, but they all flow together to create one being. The multiple patterns of the lines effectively illustrate the multifaceted parts of what makes us human.”

— Gil Bruvel

 

 

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About the Artist

Born in Sydney, Australia, in 1959, Gil Bruvel’s French-born parents moved the family back to the south of France when he was 4 years old. While taking drawing lessons at age 9 and learning sculpture basics, Gil proclaimed himself an artist. He began working with oil paint at the age of 12 and the local  environment had an enormous and lasting effect on his palette.

Gil’s father, a renowned cabinet maker instilled in Gil an understanding of precise construction and design. This education included furniture design, which Gil applied to his functional art designs in bronze years later. In 1974, Gil began studies at an art restoration workshop in Chateaurenard, France. Gil studied under M. Laurent de Montcassin learning the techniques of Old and Modern Masters as well as art history of the 14th-20th century. His duties  included restoring ancient ceilings, frescoes, and paintings.Thereafter, he set up his studio in St. Remy de Provence until 1986 when he first made his way to the United States, making it his permanent residence in 1990.

Each of his experiences has molded him into the artist he is today. When you sit on the Ponder Pad, gaze at The Wind, or handle the Chess Set you can feel 40 years of artistic development at your fingertips.

If you know you have such latent in Africa feel free to Contact us and we shall showcase your work.

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